Next Meeting

University of Birmingham - Wednesday 20th March 2019

The next meeting of the COW will take place at the University of Birmingham on Wednesday 20th March 2019 (please note that this is not a Thursday!). The meeting will start at 2pm. All talks will take place in Lecture Theatre B on the first floor of Watson Building; this is Building R15 on the campus map below.

Campus Map

Schedule

Time Speaker Title
2:00pm Dan Loughran Cubic Surfaces over Finite Fields
3:30pm Sibylle Schroll Geometric Models and Derived Invariants for Gentle Algebras
5:00pm Navid Nabijou Log Geometry, Moduli Spaces, and the Joy of Desingularisation

Abstracts

Dan Loughran (Manchester/Bath) - Cubic Surfaces over Finite Fields
In the talk I shall discuss the distribution and classification of cubic surfaces over finite fields.
Sibylle Schroll (Leicester) - Geometric Models and Derived Invariants for Gentle Algebras
Gentle algebras are a class of tame algebras which naturally arise in various different contexts such as categorifications of cluster algebras, N=2 gauge theories and Fukaya categories of surfaces. In this talk we will describe a geometric model of the bounded derived category of a gentle algebra and we will show how this model relates to the Fukaya category of a surface with boundary and stops. We will use the geometric model to give a complete derived invariant for gentle algebras. (This is joint works with S. Opper - P.G. Plamondon and C. Amiot and P.-G. Plamondon).
Navid Nabijou (Glasgow) - Log Geometry, Moduli Spaces, and the Joy of Desingularisation

Although toric varieties are vanishingly rare in nature, many geometries look "locally" like toric varieties, even if they have no global toric structure. The idea of log geometry, roughly, is to encode this local information in the data of something called a "log structure". With this at hand, various standard constructions in toric geometry (for instance: toric blowups, line bundles associated to piecewise-linear functions) can be extended to the logarithmic setting. This has myriad applications, one of the most exciting of which is to the study of moduli spaces and enumerative invariants.

In this talk I will discuss this circle of ideas, with an emphasis on explicit computations. Having done this, I will then describe joint work with L. Battistella and D. Ranganathan, in which we use log geometry to produce a desingularisation of the moduli space of relative stable maps in genus one, and apply this to derive recursion formulae for Gromov-Witten invariants of hypersurfaces.

This page is maintained by Alan Thompson and was last updated on 19/02/19. Please email comments and corrections to A.M.Thompson (at) lboro.ac.uk.